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Category III Black Water – Coming to a Vermont Basement Near You


In this high-water hiatus between receding flood waters and consistent rainfall, Vermonters are facing some potentially hazardous water damage from Category III Black Water. Category three is not a hurricane, a science fiction movie, or a navigable river. It’s dirty water and it could be in your house right now.

The IIRC (The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification)defines Categroy Three this way: Category 3 Water – That which is highly contaminated and could cause death or serious illness if consumed by humans. Examples  include sewage, rising flood water from rivers and streams, ground surface water flowing horizontally into homes. Bingo! Lake Champlain, The Winooski, The Lamoille, the run-off from the neighbor’s garden are all culprits this Spring.

In the world of flooded Vermont basements and living rooms, we think of Category three black water this way: it is either water whose origin is unsanitary or potentially infectious to humans or it is grey water (household waste water from things like laundry and dish washing) that has been around too long.

Here’s where you need the professionals to come in – not just to help you dry out your house, but to ensure that it is done correctly. If the water damage is not remediated within twenty-four to forty-eight hours, things can start
to head in the wrong direction. Most of us are already familiar with the harmful effects of mold (sneezing, headaches, difficulty breathing, and worse), but Category Three black water can carry waterborne diseases.

This stuff has to be taken seriously. And that is exactly what PuroClean is about. In the right hands, air movers, water extractors, infrared cameras, and dehumidifiers will do things your shop vac only dreams of. PuroClean also uses air scrubbers to clean the air, negative air machines with containment to prevent contamination from spreading to unaffected areas. Then they follow up and clean surfaces.

Only then will it be safe to go back into the basement…

image credit: kayakingdreamin.blogspot.com